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Kansas City, MO 64111

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Featured Insurance Blog

How Much Boat Insurance Do I Need?

Boat insurance is a must-have insurance plan if you have a boat, whether you use it to sail, fish, or cruise. While boat accidents aren’t as common as car accidents, they can happen, compromising your finances. Now that you have invested in boat insurance, do you have enough coverage? At Midwest Professional Insurance, we help you determine the amount of boat insurance sufficient for you.

How much liability coverage do I need?

Whether fishing or sailing in the water, you might be at fault for an accident resulting in property damage and bodily injury to others. Worse yet, you can be sued, putting your finances into a further mess. Your assets and future earnings can be at stake without adequate liability insurance. But when you have sufficient liability coverage, third-party claims don’t have to stress you. But how much liability coverage do you need?

At Midwest Professional Insurance, we usually advise our clients to maintain liability coverage of at least $500,000. But if you have fast, powerful boats, we recommend liability coverage of $1M plus. We also advise boaters to consider umbrella insurance for higher liability coverage.

How much physical damage coverage do I need?

Like car insurance, comprehensive and collision coverages in boat insurance compensates you when your boat is damaged or totaled by a covered peril. But how much coverage should you purchase? As a rule of thumb, purchase coverage adequate to replace your boat in the worst-case scenario. Consider your boat’s “replacement cost value” when insuring your boat. You get full compensation for your boat, incurring little out-of-pocket expenses.

Protect your boat today with insurance!

If you are still unsure about the amount of boat insurance you need for your boat, please get in touch with Midwest Professional Insurance. We will analyze your situation and advise the type and amount of boat insurance sufficient for you.

Read More

Boat insurance is a must-have insurance plan if you have a boat, whether you use it to sail, fish, or cruise. While boat accidents aren’t as common as car accidents, they can happen, compromising your finances. Now that you have invested in boat insurance, do you have enough coverage? At Midwest Professional Insurance, we help you determine the amount of boat insurance sufficient for you.

How much liability coverage do I need?

Whether fishing or sailing in the water, you might be at fault for an accident resulting in property damage and bodily injury to others. Worse yet, you can be sued, putting your finances into a further mess. Your assets and future earnings can be at stake without adequate liability insurance. But when you have sufficient liability coverage, third-party claims don’t have to stress you. But how much liability coverage do you need?

At Midwest Professional Insurance, we usually advise our clients to maintain liability coverage of at least $500,000. But if you have fast, powerful boats, we recommend liability coverage of $1M plus. We also advise boaters to consider umbrella insurance for higher liability coverage.

How much physical damage coverage do I need?

Like car insurance, comprehensive and collision coverages in boat insurance compensates you when your boat is damaged or totaled by a covered peril. But how much coverage should you purchase? As a rule of thumb, purchase coverage adequate to replace your boat in the worst-case scenario. Consider your boat’s “replacement cost value” when insuring your boat. You get full compensation for your boat, incurring little out-of-pocket expenses.

Protect your boat today with insurance!

If you are still unsure about the amount of boat insurance you need for your boat, please get in touch with Midwest Professional Insurance. We will analyze your situation and advise the type and amount of boat insurance sufficient for you.

What’s An HMO? Understanding Your Health Insurance Plan

Health insurance can be confusing, and understanding your policy can be a key part of ensuring that you’re making the most of all that your plan has to offer. Here, we’ll take a look at how your HMO works. 

What Is An HMO?

An HMO, or health management organization, is made up of a network of medical care providers. People who have health insurance through an HMO receive most of their care through a primary care provider, or PCP. 

How Can Patients Get Specialty Care Through An HMO?

Patients who have health insurance through an HMO usually need to see their primary care physician for a referral to a specialist. Their primary care physician will treat their condition if possible, or refer them to a specialist if the patient needs specialty treatment.

Why Some People Prefer HMO Insurance Plans

In an HMO plan, patients are limited to choosing from care providers within the network of the HMO. This means that premiums are lower than insurance plans that allow patients to choose any doctor. Some people prefer to have more freedom in choosing their healthcare provider, and would rather use a different plan that does not require them to stay within an HMO network. Alternative plans to HMOs include point-of-service, or POS plans, preferred provider organizations, or PPO plans.

Reach Out To Midwest Professional Insurance Today

If you’re searching for the right health insurance plan for your needs, reach out to an agent at Midwest Professional Insurance today. They’ll work with you to ensure that they understand what you want from your plan, helping you choose an option that makes sense.

Read More

Health insurance can be confusing, and understanding your policy can be a key part of ensuring that you’re making the most of all that your plan has to offer. Here, we’ll take a look at how your HMO works. 

What Is An HMO?

An HMO, or health management organization, is made up of a network of medical care providers. People who have health insurance through an HMO receive most of their care through a primary care provider, or PCP. 

How Can Patients Get Specialty Care Through An HMO?

Patients who have health insurance through an HMO usually need to see their primary care physician for a referral to a specialist. Their primary care physician will treat their condition if possible, or refer them to a specialist if the patient needs specialty treatment.

Why Some People Prefer HMO Insurance Plans

In an HMO plan, patients are limited to choosing from care providers within the network of the HMO. This means that premiums are lower than insurance plans that allow patients to choose any doctor. Some people prefer to have more freedom in choosing their healthcare provider, and would rather use a different plan that does not require them to stay within an HMO network. Alternative plans to HMOs include point-of-service, or POS plans, preferred provider organizations, or PPO plans.

Reach Out To Midwest Professional Insurance Today

If you’re searching for the right health insurance plan for your needs, reach out to an agent at Midwest Professional Insurance today. They’ll work with you to ensure that they understand what you want from your plan, helping you choose an option that makes sense.

What Does Condo Insurance Cover?

In short, condo insurance, also known as H06 insurance, covers what the condo association won’t cover. This is typically the interior of your unit. Condo insurance also provides liability coverage for any damage to others’ property or injuries that your guest might incur while in your condo. However, condo owners should always read the fine print to discover exactly what is covered as well as what’s not covered. Our team at Midwest Professional Insurance is committed to educating condo owners on what’s covered under condo insurance as well as the other benefits associated with this type of insurance.

The ABCs of What’s Covered Under a Condo Insurance Policy?

Your personal items, as well as any damage to the interior structure of your unit, fall under a condo insurance policy. This can include damage caused by natural disasters and other situations that include theft and vandalism. Fire, wind, and hail, are examples of natural disasters that would fall under a condo insurance policy in the event of damage caused by these natural disasters. However, certain situations that involve water damage may fall under a flood insurance policy rather than your condo insurance policy. As stated above, condo insurance also provides coverage for any injury or damage to the personal property of your visitors while they are in your unit. Some policies may cover living expenses if you must vacate your unit while it is being repaired. 

Conversely, the condo association’s insurance covers damage to the exterior of the condo, as well as the common areas. This includes the land outside of your building as well as the stairs, elevators, lobby, and anything else on the property. It also covers any injuries that may occur in the common areas of the condo. If you have questions regarding what condo insurance covers, give us a call. Our team at the Midwest Professional Insurance company is standing by.

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In short, condo insurance, also known as H06 insurance, covers what the condo association won’t cover. This is typically the interior of your unit. Condo insurance also provides liability coverage for any damage to others’ property or injuries that your guest might incur while in your condo. However, condo owners should always read the fine print to discover exactly what is covered as well as what’s not covered. Our team at Midwest Professional Insurance is committed to educating condo owners on what’s covered under condo insurance as well as the other benefits associated with this type of insurance.

The ABCs of What’s Covered Under a Condo Insurance Policy?

Your personal items, as well as any damage to the interior structure of your unit, fall under a condo insurance policy. This can include damage caused by natural disasters and other situations that include theft and vandalism. Fire, wind, and hail, are examples of natural disasters that would fall under a condo insurance policy in the event of damage caused by these natural disasters. However, certain situations that involve water damage may fall under a flood insurance policy rather than your condo insurance policy. As stated above, condo insurance also provides coverage for any injury or damage to the personal property of your visitors while they are in your unit. Some policies may cover living expenses if you must vacate your unit while it is being repaired. 

Conversely, the condo association’s insurance covers damage to the exterior of the condo, as well as the common areas. This includes the land outside of your building as well as the stairs, elevators, lobby, and anything else on the property. It also covers any injuries that may occur in the common areas of the condo. If you have questions regarding what condo insurance covers, give us a call. Our team at the Midwest Professional Insurance company is standing by.

Cyber Liability Insurance

“As reliance on technology continues to increase, new exposures continue to emerge. As your business grows, make sure your cyber liability coverage grows with it. I am here to help you analyze your needs and make the right coverage decisions to protect your operations from unnecessary risk.



As technology becomes increasingly important for successful business operations, the value of a strong cyber liability insurance policy will only continue to grow. The continued rise in the amount of information stored and transferred electronically has resulted in a remarkable increase in the potential exposures facing businesses. In an age where a stolen laptop or hacked account can instantly compromise the personal data of thousands of customers, or an ill-advised post on a social media site can be read by hundreds in a matter of minutes, protecting yourself from cyber liability is just as important as some of the more traditional exposures businesses account for in their general commercial liability policies.

Why Cyber Liability Insurance?

A traditional business liability policy is extremely unlikely to protect against most cyber exposures. Standard commercial policies are written to insure against injury or physical loss and will do little, if anything, to shield you from electronic damages and the associated costs they may incur. Exposures are vast, ranging from the content you put on your website to stored customer data. Awareness of the potential cyber liabilities your company faces is essential to managing risk through proper coverage.

Possible exposures covered by a typical cyber liability policy may include the following:

· Data breaches: Increased government regulations have placed more responsibility on companies to protect clients’ personal information. In the event of a breach, notification of the affected parties is now required by law. This will add to costs that will also include security fixes, identity theft protection for the affected and protection from possible legal action. While companies operating online are at a heightened risk, even companies that don’t transmit personal data over the internet, but still store it in electronic form, could be susceptible to breaches through data lost to unauthorized employee access or hardware theft.

· Intellectual property rights: Your company’s online presence, whether it be through a corporate website, blogs or social media, opens you up to some of the same exposures faced by publishers. This can include libel, copyright or trademark infringement and defamation, among other things.

· Damages to a third-party system: If an email sent from your server has a virus that crashes the system of a customer, or the software your company distributes fails, resulting in a loss for a third party, you could be held liable for the damages.

· System failure: A natural disaster, malicious activity or fire could all cause physical damages that could result in data or code loss. While the physical damages to your system hardware would be covered under your existing business liability policy, data or code loss due to the incident would not be.

· Cyber extortion: Hackers can hijack websites, networks and stored data, denying access to you or your customers. They often demand money to restore your systems to working order. This can cause a temporary loss of revenue plus generate costs associated with paying the hacker’s demands or rebuilding if damage is done.

· Business interruption: If your primary business operations require the use of computer systems, a disaster that cripples your ability to transmit data could cause you, or a third party that depends on your services, to lose potential revenue. From a server failure to a data breach, such an incident can affect your day-to-day operations. Time and resources that normally would have gone elsewhere will need to be directed towards the problem, which could result in further losses. This is especially important as denial of service attacks by hackers have been on the rise. Such attacks block access to certain websites by either rerouting traffic to a different site or overloading an organization’s server.

Cyber liability insurance is specifically designed to address the risks that come with using modern technology; risks that other types of business liability coverage simply won’t. The level of coverage your business needs is based on your individual operations and can vary depending on your range of exposure. It is important for us to work together to identify your areas of risk so a policy can be tailored to fit your unique situation.

Read More

“As reliance on technology continues to increase, new exposures continue to emerge. As your business grows, make sure your cyber liability coverage grows with it. I am here to help you analyze your needs and make the right coverage decisions to protect your operations from unnecessary risk.



As technology becomes increasingly important for successful business operations, the value of a strong cyber liability insurance policy will only continue to grow. The continued rise in the amount of information stored and transferred electronically has resulted in a remarkable increase in the potential exposures facing businesses. In an age where a stolen laptop or hacked account can instantly compromise the personal data of thousands of customers, or an ill-advised post on a social media site can be read by hundreds in a matter of minutes, protecting yourself from cyber liability is just as important as some of the more traditional exposures businesses account for in their general commercial liability policies.

Why Cyber Liability Insurance?

A traditional business liability policy is extremely unlikely to protect against most cyber exposures. Standard commercial policies are written to insure against injury or physical loss and will do little, if anything, to shield you from electronic damages and the associated costs they may incur. Exposures are vast, ranging from the content you put on your website to stored customer data. Awareness of the potential cyber liabilities your company faces is essential to managing risk through proper coverage.

Possible exposures covered by a typical cyber liability policy may include the following:

· Data breaches: Increased government regulations have placed more responsibility on companies to protect clients’ personal information. In the event of a breach, notification of the affected parties is now required by law. This will add to costs that will also include security fixes, identity theft protection for the affected and protection from possible legal action. While companies operating online are at a heightened risk, even companies that don’t transmit personal data over the internet, but still store it in electronic form, could be susceptible to breaches through data lost to unauthorized employee access or hardware theft.

· Intellectual property rights: Your company’s online presence, whether it be through a corporate website, blogs or social media, opens you up to some of the same exposures faced by publishers. This can include libel, copyright or trademark infringement and defamation, among other things.

· Damages to a third-party system: If an email sent from your server has a virus that crashes the system of a customer, or the software your company distributes fails, resulting in a loss for a third party, you could be held liable for the damages.

· System failure: A natural disaster, malicious activity or fire could all cause physical damages that could result in data or code loss. While the physical damages to your system hardware would be covered under your existing business liability policy, data or code loss due to the incident would not be.

· Cyber extortion: Hackers can hijack websites, networks and stored data, denying access to you or your customers. They often demand money to restore your systems to working order. This can cause a temporary loss of revenue plus generate costs associated with paying the hacker’s demands or rebuilding if damage is done.

· Business interruption: If your primary business operations require the use of computer systems, a disaster that cripples your ability to transmit data could cause you, or a third party that depends on your services, to lose potential revenue. From a server failure to a data breach, such an incident can affect your day-to-day operations. Time and resources that normally would have gone elsewhere will need to be directed towards the problem, which could result in further losses. This is especially important as denial of service attacks by hackers have been on the rise. Such attacks block access to certain websites by either rerouting traffic to a different site or overloading an organization’s server.

Cyber liability insurance is specifically designed to address the risks that come with using modern technology; risks that other types of business liability coverage simply won’t. The level of coverage your business needs is based on your individual operations and can vary depending on your range of exposure. It is important for us to work together to identify your areas of risk so a policy can be tailored to fit your unique situation.

To Bundle, or Not to Bundle

Although discounts are the main reason people bundle their insurance policies, never assume that bundling is the cheapest option. Your needs and circumstances will dictate whether you should combine your policies with one carrier.



If you’ve ever shopped around for insurance, you’ve likely been asked if you want to bundle your policies—in other words, combine your home or renters, auto and life insurance policies with the same carrier. Although you have the option to shop around individually for each policy, it almost always makes sense to have the same carrier cover as many of your policies as possible.

Benefits of Bundling

  • The discount—Most policyholders bundle their policies because of the promise of a discount. The amount varies by provider but can generally range between 5%-25%.
  • The option of a single deductible—With bundled policies, your deductible may be cheaper in the event of a claim that affects multiple policies. For example, if your home and auto policies are with two separate carriers, and a hailstorm damages your home and your car, you’re responsible for paying both your home and auto deductibles before receiving payment. But if you bundle your policies, your provider may offer you the option to pay only the higher of the two deductibles.
  • Less chance of being dropped—If you’ve made claims or gotten tickets, having your policies bundled with one provider can decrease the chance of them dropping you.

When it Doesn’t Pay to Bundle

It isn’t always better to bundle your policies with one insurance carrier. Here’s when it may be better to split them up:

  • If you have tickets or past claims that make your auto insurance expensive—In this case, it may be cheaper overall to buy each policy from separate providers.
  • When premiums increase—Bundling discourages people from price shopping, which makes it easier for providers to increase their rates. Most assume that you won’t go through the effort of shopping around when your policies renew.
  • If policies aren’t technically bundled—Some carriers may insure you with an affiliated company. Although you may get a discount with that company, you’ll lose the convenience of paying your premium with one familiar provider.
Read More

Although discounts are the main reason people bundle their insurance policies, never assume that bundling is the cheapest option. Your needs and circumstances will dictate whether you should combine your policies with one carrier.



If you’ve ever shopped around for insurance, you’ve likely been asked if you want to bundle your policies—in other words, combine your home or renters, auto and life insurance policies with the same carrier. Although you have the option to shop around individually for each policy, it almost always makes sense to have the same carrier cover as many of your policies as possible.

Benefits of Bundling

  • The discount—Most policyholders bundle their policies because of the promise of a discount. The amount varies by provider but can generally range between 5%-25%.
  • The option of a single deductible—With bundled policies, your deductible may be cheaper in the event of a claim that affects multiple policies. For example, if your home and auto policies are with two separate carriers, and a hailstorm damages your home and your car, you’re responsible for paying both your home and auto deductibles before receiving payment. But if you bundle your policies, your provider may offer you the option to pay only the higher of the two deductibles.
  • Less chance of being dropped—If you’ve made claims or gotten tickets, having your policies bundled with one provider can decrease the chance of them dropping you.

When it Doesn’t Pay to Bundle

It isn’t always better to bundle your policies with one insurance carrier. Here’s when it may be better to split them up:

  • If you have tickets or past claims that make your auto insurance expensive—In this case, it may be cheaper overall to buy each policy from separate providers.
  • When premiums increase—Bundling discourages people from price shopping, which makes it easier for providers to increase their rates. Most assume that you won’t go through the effort of shopping around when your policies renew.
  • If policies aren’t technically bundled—Some carriers may insure you with an affiliated company. Although you may get a discount with that company, you’ll lose the convenience of paying your premium with one familiar provider.

How to Make—and Keep—Your New Year’s Resolution

2022! Crazy, I didn’t think I would ever write that on a check (yes, I’m still writing checks!) I plan to get more efficient this year and better about TIME. I enjoy seeing pictures of your families and the way you are spending your life too! Let’s welcome Royce, our newest team member to our Insurance Family. Dave, Lani, myself, Darren and Royce will continue to look out for you in 2022!



Fitness, finances, and weight loss are often the three most popular New Year’s resolutions

As the new year approaches, you may find yourself reflecting on the past year. This introspection is a significant first step toward selecting a New Year’s resolution to help you grow as a person. However, 80% of New Year’s resolutions fail by mid-February due to a lack of self-discipline, according to U.S. News and World Report. That’s why it’s important to set yourself up for success when you’re choosing a resolution.

Regardless of what you choose as your resolution, make sure it’s a “SMART” goal—one that is specific, measurable, attainable, realistic and timely—to increase the odds that you will stick to it. Here’s what that means:

Specific—A specific goal is simple and strategic. It’s something you can easily conceptualize. For example, instead of saying you’ll eat healthier, be specific about how you can actually do that (e.g., eat a vegetable at every meal, eat breakfast every day or eat fish twice a week).

Measurable—A measurable goal is quantified. You’ll be able to see if you’re making progress as you go. For example, if you want to save $500 for your emergency fund or save for a down payment on a home, you’ll be able to track your savings and prove you’re making progress along the way.

Achievable—An achievable goal is realistic and attainable. If you’ve never worked out before, a daily workout goal won’t likely be feasible or sustainable in the long run. Alternatively, if you’re already taking walks, start with increasing the duration or frequency of them.

· Relevant—A relevant goal needs to make sense or be appropriate to you. You want your goal to matter, so reflect on the past year about what’s working in your life and what’s not. Timing is equally important, so ensure this is the right time for you to tackle the resolution.

· Timely—A timely goal is accomplished within a specific time frame. You can adjust this period as needed and make new goals or deadlines after achieving the first one.

Remember that New Year’s resolutions don’t have to be health-related, so find what matters to you to help you live a better life in 2022.

Don’t Let The Weather Derail Your Workout

If you find it harder to keep up with your workouts as the temperatures drop, you’re not alone. Many Americans find it increasingly difficult to remain committed as the holiday blues, shorter days and less-than-ideal weather create obstacles. Whether you’re a gym-goer or outdoor exerciser, there are simple ways to overcome winter obstacles and keep your fitness on track:

  • Remember to warm up. If you’re an outdoor exerciser and the weather is colder, try doing your warmup inside. Not only will you raise your internal body temperature before going outside, but you’ll also increase the temperature of your muscles, which can reduce your risk for injury.
  • Prep the night before. If you’re an early morning exerciser, set out everything you need for the next day the night before. Then, all you need to do when your alarm goes off is get up, get dressed and go to the gym.
  • Have a backup plan. Even the most dedicated exercisers can lose their motivation. That’s why it’s essential to have a backup workout plan that you can do at home. It doesn’t have to be lengthy, as doing something is better than doing nothing at all.

Staying on top of your fitness during winter can be challenging, but keep pushing and think about why you work out in the first place. Focus on your reason.

The Health Benefits of Being Organized

The new year can signal a fresh start for many. As such, January is dubbed Get Organized Month as many people are eager to tackle their homes’ organization. Decluttering can do more for your health than you may realize. Consider the following health benefits of being organized:

  • Boost your energy and productivity. A messy area may make you feel confused or scattered. When your space is clutter-free, you can focus more on meaningful activities.
  • Reduce your stress and anxiety. By eliminating clutter, you’ll feel more in control and able to handle challenges that come your way.
  • Sleep better. When you keep up with the organization, you can rest easy at night knowing that everything is cleaned up and in its place.
  • Eat healthier. Not only does snack and food organization reduce clutter, but it can also help you easily grab healthy options and control portions.

This month is a great time to get organized and set yourself up for a clutter-free year to feel more balanced.

Read More

2022! Crazy, I didn’t think I would ever write that on a check (yes, I’m still writing checks!) I plan to get more efficient this year and better about TIME. I enjoy seeing pictures of your families and the way you are spending your life too! Let’s welcome Royce, our newest team member to our Insurance Family. Dave, Lani, myself, Darren and Royce will continue to look out for you in 2022!



Fitness, finances, and weight loss are often the three most popular New Year’s resolutions

As the new year approaches, you may find yourself reflecting on the past year. This introspection is a significant first step toward selecting a New Year’s resolution to help you grow as a person. However, 80% of New Year’s resolutions fail by mid-February due to a lack of self-discipline, according to U.S. News and World Report. That’s why it’s important to set yourself up for success when you’re choosing a resolution.

Regardless of what you choose as your resolution, make sure it’s a “SMART” goal—one that is specific, measurable, attainable, realistic and timely—to increase the odds that you will stick to it. Here’s what that means:

Specific—A specific goal is simple and strategic. It’s something you can easily conceptualize. For example, instead of saying you’ll eat healthier, be specific about how you can actually do that (e.g., eat a vegetable at every meal, eat breakfast every day or eat fish twice a week).

Measurable—A measurable goal is quantified. You’ll be able to see if you’re making progress as you go. For example, if you want to save $500 for your emergency fund or save for a down payment on a home, you’ll be able to track your savings and prove you’re making progress along the way.

Achievable—An achievable goal is realistic and attainable. If you’ve never worked out before, a daily workout goal won’t likely be feasible or sustainable in the long run. Alternatively, if you’re already taking walks, start with increasing the duration or frequency of them.

· Relevant—A relevant goal needs to make sense or be appropriate to you. You want your goal to matter, so reflect on the past year about what’s working in your life and what’s not. Timing is equally important, so ensure this is the right time for you to tackle the resolution.

· Timely—A timely goal is accomplished within a specific time frame. You can adjust this period as needed and make new goals or deadlines after achieving the first one.

Remember that New Year’s resolutions don’t have to be health-related, so find what matters to you to help you live a better life in 2022.

Don’t Let The Weather Derail Your Workout

If you find it harder to keep up with your workouts as the temperatures drop, you’re not alone. Many Americans find it increasingly difficult to remain committed as the holiday blues, shorter days and less-than-ideal weather create obstacles. Whether you’re a gym-goer or outdoor exerciser, there are simple ways to overcome winter obstacles and keep your fitness on track:

  • Remember to warm up. If you’re an outdoor exerciser and the weather is colder, try doing your warmup inside. Not only will you raise your internal body temperature before going outside, but you’ll also increase the temperature of your muscles, which can reduce your risk for injury.
  • Prep the night before. If you’re an early morning exerciser, set out everything you need for the next day the night before. Then, all you need to do when your alarm goes off is get up, get dressed and go to the gym.
  • Have a backup plan. Even the most dedicated exercisers can lose their motivation. That’s why it’s essential to have a backup workout plan that you can do at home. It doesn’t have to be lengthy, as doing something is better than doing nothing at all.

Staying on top of your fitness during winter can be challenging, but keep pushing and think about why you work out in the first place. Focus on your reason.

The Health Benefits of Being Organized

The new year can signal a fresh start for many. As such, January is dubbed Get Organized Month as many people are eager to tackle their homes’ organization. Decluttering can do more for your health than you may realize. Consider the following health benefits of being organized:

  • Boost your energy and productivity. A messy area may make you feel confused or scattered. When your space is clutter-free, you can focus more on meaningful activities.
  • Reduce your stress and anxiety. By eliminating clutter, you’ll feel more in control and able to handle challenges that come your way.
  • Sleep better. When you keep up with the organization, you can rest easy at night knowing that everything is cleaned up and in its place.
  • Eat healthier. Not only does snack and food organization reduce clutter, but it can also help you easily grab healthy options and control portions.

This month is a great time to get organized and set yourself up for a clutter-free year to feel more balanced.

Boat insurance possibilities for you

Boat insurance is a must if you want to enjoy your boat in peace. With the right coverage and boat insurance, you can enjoy your boat without thinking of potential fuss. 

Midwest Professional Insurance happily offers boat insurance to residents who reside in the following states:

  • Kansas
  • Missouri
  • Colorado
  • Illinois
  • Idaho
  • Texas

Give us a call today to hear more about boat insurance options.

What is covered?

You might think your boat is already covered under your homeowners’ insurance policy. While some of the basics will be covered, quite a few things might not be. A couple of examples of boat insurance you might want to look into that you may very well end up needing include:

  • Liability insurance or umbrella insurance. Whether someone steps on your boat and trips or you hit another boat in an accident, you might be liable to pay for repair costs or medical costs. In addition, other people on your or the hit boat can sue you, so you might want to be covered for either possibility. 
  • Theft and insurance against your boat getting destroyed. If someone steals something from your boat or the boat itself, insurance for this can help out. Another option is that someone either sets fire to your boat or another disaster happens, destroying your boat all at once. If you are covered for this, your insurance can replace your boat at no extra cost. So consider whether it is worth risking not getting insured against these options. 

If you want to talk about boat insurance, you can call Midwest Professional Insurance or you can start by comparing quotes yourself on our website here. 

Read More

Boat insurance is a must if you want to enjoy your boat in peace. With the right coverage and boat insurance, you can enjoy your boat without thinking of potential fuss. 

Midwest Professional Insurance happily offers boat insurance to residents who reside in the following states:

  • Kansas
  • Missouri
  • Colorado
  • Illinois
  • Idaho
  • Texas

Give us a call today to hear more about boat insurance options.

What is covered?

You might think your boat is already covered under your homeowners’ insurance policy. While some of the basics will be covered, quite a few things might not be. A couple of examples of boat insurance you might want to look into that you may very well end up needing include:

  • Liability insurance or umbrella insurance. Whether someone steps on your boat and trips or you hit another boat in an accident, you might be liable to pay for repair costs or medical costs. In addition, other people on your or the hit boat can sue you, so you might want to be covered for either possibility. 
  • Theft and insurance against your boat getting destroyed. If someone steals something from your boat or the boat itself, insurance for this can help out. Another option is that someone either sets fire to your boat or another disaster happens, destroying your boat all at once. If you are covered for this, your insurance can replace your boat at no extra cost. So consider whether it is worth risking not getting insured against these options. 

If you want to talk about boat insurance, you can call Midwest Professional Insurance or you can start by comparing quotes yourself on our website here. 

Survival Guide for Parents of Teen Drivers

Watching your teenager drive off in a car is one of the most daunting moments of any parent’s journey. Not only do you fear for their safety, but you also worry about the impact of adding a new driver to your insurance premiums. There are some steps you can take to reduce your worries on both fronts. 

Safe Driving Rules: 

  • Most of us use our phones for navigation or music while driving, and your teen is likely no exception. To reduce the distraction, instill a habit of turning off all notifications. Better still to have an out of sight, out of reach place for the phone until they reach their destination. 
  • Safety courses can not only give your child better driving habits, and they can also potentially help reduce your rates.
  • Telemetrics is a helpful nanny while your child is out on the road. These are apps or devices that monitor driving habits. Some insurance companies offer discounts for good driving. Your child will know their habits are being recorded and that knowledge can keep them mindful of their driving behavior. 
  • Check out safety ratings for possible rides. Not only will safety features bring you greater peace of mind, but they will also potentially offer a better rate on your premiums. 

Important Considerations

  • Tell your insurance about new drivers. If an accident occurs without that update, you run the risk of a denied claim or suspended policy. 
  • Consider adding an umbrella policy. Should the worst occur and your coverage is insufficient, an umbrella policy becomes a rainy day fund to protect your family’s financial wellbeing. 
  • Roadside assistance is another good addition. Should they land in a ditch or pop a tire, they’ll have the help they need. 

When it comes time to get your teen insurance coverage, it’s often cheaper to add them to your existing policy rather than start them a new one. When you are ready to look at your options, call or stop by Midwest Professional Insurance to find the policy that offers you and your family the best protection. 

Read More

Watching your teenager drive off in a car is one of the most daunting moments of any parent’s journey. Not only do you fear for their safety, but you also worry about the impact of adding a new driver to your insurance premiums. There are some steps you can take to reduce your worries on both fronts. 

Safe Driving Rules: 

  • Most of us use our phones for navigation or music while driving, and your teen is likely no exception. To reduce the distraction, instill a habit of turning off all notifications. Better still to have an out of sight, out of reach place for the phone until they reach their destination. 
  • Safety courses can not only give your child better driving habits, and they can also potentially help reduce your rates.
  • Telemetrics is a helpful nanny while your child is out on the road. These are apps or devices that monitor driving habits. Some insurance companies offer discounts for good driving. Your child will know their habits are being recorded and that knowledge can keep them mindful of their driving behavior. 
  • Check out safety ratings for possible rides. Not only will safety features bring you greater peace of mind, but they will also potentially offer a better rate on your premiums. 

Important Considerations

  • Tell your insurance about new drivers. If an accident occurs without that update, you run the risk of a denied claim or suspended policy. 
  • Consider adding an umbrella policy. Should the worst occur and your coverage is insufficient, an umbrella policy becomes a rainy day fund to protect your family’s financial wellbeing. 
  • Roadside assistance is another good addition. Should they land in a ditch or pop a tire, they’ll have the help they need. 

When it comes time to get your teen insurance coverage, it’s often cheaper to add them to your existing policy rather than start them a new one. When you are ready to look at your options, call or stop by Midwest Professional Insurance to find the policy that offers you and your family the best protection. 

Avoiding Common Condo Insurance Mistakes

Are you uncertain of about your condo insurance and aren’t sure what kind of steps you need to take to protect yourself? Please reach out to us at Midwest Professional Insurance to learn more and to make sure that these common mistakes do not affect your policy options. 

Assuming the Owner’s Insurance Protects You 

Your condo association owner likely has specialized coverage for the structure of the building. You might think that this protects you – it does not. Condo insurance is designed to kick in when your belongings are damaged. The owner’s association only covers the structure – not your items. 

Not Knowing What is Covered 

Things like smoke, fire, explosions, vandalism, theft, injuries, plumbing, lighting system damage, alternative living expenses, and more are all covered in your condo insurance. It may not cover things like floods, wear and tear, earthquakes, intentional damage, pest damage, and sewage issues. 

Picking Cash-Value Reimbursement 

You might think you’ll get more money with a cash-value reimbursement policy. However, you are mistaken. Deprecation to the value of that good will cut back how much you get. By contrast, replacement coverage will pay to replace your good, no matter what its initial price. 

Trying to Save Money With Bare Walls Policies 

Don’t try to save money by buying a bare walls policy because it will only cover the bare structural design of the condo. An all-in policy will cover things like fixtures, structures, plumbing, wiring, and more. As a result, it is important to pay attention to this facet before buying a policy. 

Not Trusting Your Provider 

If you feel like you’re working with a condo insurance provider you cannot trust, please reach out to us at Midwest Professional Insurance right away. Our team fully understands the different processes needed to handle these steps. 

Read More

Are you uncertain of about your condo insurance and aren’t sure what kind of steps you need to take to protect yourself? Please reach out to us at Midwest Professional Insurance to learn more and to make sure that these common mistakes do not affect your policy options. 

Assuming the Owner’s Insurance Protects You 

Your condo association owner likely has specialized coverage for the structure of the building. You might think that this protects you – it does not. Condo insurance is designed to kick in when your belongings are damaged. The owner’s association only covers the structure – not your items. 

Not Knowing What is Covered 

Things like smoke, fire, explosions, vandalism, theft, injuries, plumbing, lighting system damage, alternative living expenses, and more are all covered in your condo insurance. It may not cover things like floods, wear and tear, earthquakes, intentional damage, pest damage, and sewage issues. 

Picking Cash-Value Reimbursement 

You might think you’ll get more money with a cash-value reimbursement policy. However, you are mistaken. Deprecation to the value of that good will cut back how much you get. By contrast, replacement coverage will pay to replace your good, no matter what its initial price. 

Trying to Save Money With Bare Walls Policies 

Don’t try to save money by buying a bare walls policy because it will only cover the bare structural design of the condo. An all-in policy will cover things like fixtures, structures, plumbing, wiring, and more. As a result, it is important to pay attention to this facet before buying a policy. 

Not Trusting Your Provider 

If you feel like you’re working with a condo insurance provider you cannot trust, please reach out to us at Midwest Professional Insurance right away. Our team fully understands the different processes needed to handle these steps. 

COVID-19 Workplace Safety Guidance for Federal Contractor and Subcontractors

On Sept. 24, 2021, the Safer Federal Workforce Task Force (Task Force) released new guidance (the Guidance) on COVID-19 workplace safety protocols for federal contractors and subcontractors. The goal of the Guidance is to get more people vaccinated.

The Guidance requires each covered contract and contract-like instrument to include a clause requiring the contractor and their subcontractors to comply with all guidelines for workplace locations published by the Task Force.

These workplace safety protocols will apply to all covered contractor employees, including contractor or subcontractor employees in covered contractor workplaces who are not working on a federal government contract or contract-like instrument.

Federal contractors and subcontractors with a covered contract will be required to conform to the following workplace safety protocols:

  1. COVID-19 vaccination;
  2. Masking and physical distancing; and
  3. and Appointment of COVID-19 coordinators

Action Steps

Covered contractors must review and adhere to the requirements of the Guidance. They are also responsible for ensuring that covered contractor employees comply with workplace safety protocols.

Visit our blog page to read the full COVID-19 Workplace Safety Guidance for Federal Contractor and Subcontractors

https://www.mwpins.com/blog/

Covered Contractor Guidance

Covered contractor employees must comply with agency COVID-19 workplace safety requirements while in federal workplaces. Agencies are strongly encouraged to incorporate a clause requiring compliance with this Guidance into contracts that are not covered or directly addressed by the executive order—Ensuring Adequate COVID-19 Safety Protocols for Federal Contractors (the order) because the contractor is under the Simplified Acquisition Threshold as defined in section 2.101 of the Federal Acquisition Regulation (FAR) or is a contract or subcontract for the manufacturing of products.

Covered Contractors

Federal contractors are subject to the Guidance if they have a covered contract. Covered contractors include executive departments and agencies, including independent establishments subject to the Federal Property and Administrative Services Act.

Covered contracts include any new contract; contract-like instrument; solicitation for a contract or contract-like instrument; extension or renewal of an existing contract or contract-like instrument; and exercise of an option on an existing contract or contract-like instrument, if it is a:

  1. Procurement contract or contract-like instrument for services, construction, or a leasehold interest in real property;
  2. Contract or contract-like instrument for services covered by the Service Contract Act, 41 U.S.C. 6701 et seq.;
  3. Contract or contract-like instrument for concessions, including any concessions contract excluded by Department of Labor regulations at 29 C.F.R. 4.133(b); or
  4. Contract or contract-like instrument entered into with the federal government in connection with federal property or lands and related to offering services for federal employees, their dependents, or the general public.

The Guidance does not apply to (i) grants; (ii) contracts, contract-like instruments, or agreements with Indian Tribes under the Indian Self-Determination and Education Assistance Act (Public Law 93-638), as amended; (iii) contracts or subcontracts whose value is equal to or less than the simplified acquisition threshold, as the term is defined in section 2.101 of the Federal Acquisition Regulation; (iv) employees who perform work outside the United States or its outlying areas, as those terms are defined in section 2.101 of the Federal Acquisition Regulation; or (v) subcontracts solely for the provision of products.

Vaccination Requirements

Covered contractors must ensure that all covered contractor employees are fully vaccinated for COVID-19 unless the employee is legally entitled to an accommodation. Covered contractor employees must be fully vaccinated no later than Dec. 8, 2021. After that date, all covered contractor employees must be fully vaccinated by the first day of the period of performance on an exercised option or extended or renewed contract when the clause has been incorporated into the covered contract.

Covered contractors may be required to provide accommodations to covered contractor employees who communicate to their covered contractor that they are not vaccinated against COVID-19 because of a disability (which would include medical conditions) or a sincerely held religious belief, practice, or observance. Covered contractors should review and consider what accommodations they must offer. Requests for “medical accommodation” or “medical exceptions” should be treated as requests for disability accommodations.

Should a federal agency have an urgent, mission-critical need for a covered contractor to have covered contractor employees begin work on a covered contract or at a covered workplace before becoming fully vaccinated, the agency head may approve an exception for the covered contractor. In the case of such limited exceptions, covered contractors must ensure these covered contractor employees are fully vaccinated within 60 days of beginning work on a covered contract or at a covered workplace. Covered contractors must further ensure that such employees comply with masking and physical distancing requirements in covered workplaces prior to being fully vaccinated.

Covered contractors must review their covered employees’ documentation to prove vaccination status. Covered contractors must require covered contractor employees to show or provide one of the following copies:

  1. The record of immunization from a health care provider or pharmacy;
  2. The COVID-19 vaccination record card;
  3. Medical records documenting the vaccination;
  4. Immunization records from a public health or State immunization information system; or
  5. Any other official documentation verifying vaccination with information on the vaccine name, date(s) of administration, and the name of health care professional or clinic site administering vaccine.

Covered contractors may allow covered contractor employees to show or provide their employer with a digital copy of such records, including a:

  1. Digital photo;
  2. Scanned image; or
  3. PDF of such a record.

Covered contractors must ensure compliance with the requirements in this Guidance related to the showing or provision of proper vaccination documentation. They are strongly encouraged to incorporate similar vaccination requirements into their non-covered contracts and agreements with noncovered contractors whose employees perform work at covered contractor workplaces but who do not work on or in connection with a federal contract (e.g., such as those contracts and agreements related to the provision of food services, on-site security or grounds keeping services at covered contractor workplaces).

Face Coverings and Physical Distancing

Covered contractors must ensure that all individuals, including covered contractor employees and visitors, comply with published Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) guidance for masking and physical distancing at a covered contractor workplace. In addition to the face coverings and physical distance guidance, contractors must follow applicable CDC guidance for mask-wearing and physical distancing in specific settings, including health care, transportation, correctional and detention facilities, and schools.

Fully vaccinated individuals must wear a mask in indoor settings, except for limited exceptions in areas of high or substantial community transmission. In addition, fully vaccinated individuals do not need to wear a mask in areas of low or moderate community transmission, nor do they need to physically distance, regardless of the level of transmission in the area.

Individuals who are not fully vaccinated must wear a mask indoors and in certain outdoor settings, regardless of the level of community transmission in the area. To the extent practicable, individuals who are not fully vaccinated should maintain a distance of at least 6 feet from others at all times, including in offices, conference rooms, and all other communal and workspaces.

Covered contractors must require individuals in covered contractor workplaces who are required to wear a mask to:

  1. Wear appropriate masks consistently and correctly (over mouth and nose).
  2. Wear appropriate masks in any common area or shared workspace (including open floorplan office spaces, cubicle embankments, and conference rooms).
  3. Wear a mask in crowded outdoor settings or during outdoor activities that involve sustained close contact with other people who are not fully vaccinated, consistent with CDC guidance.

Covered contractors may be required to provide an accommodation to covered contractor employees that cannot wear masks because of a disability or because of a sincerely held religious belief, practice, or observance. Covered contractors should review and consider what accommodation they must offer. Covered contractors may provide exceptions to face covering and/or physical distancing requirements consistent with CDC guidelines. They may also provide exceptions for covered contractor employees who are unable to wear a mask because of difficulty breathing or activities for which wearing a mask would create a risk to workplace safety as determined by a workplace risk assessment. Any exceptions must be approved in writing by an authorized representative of the covered contractor to ensure compliance with this Guidance at covered contractor workplaces.

Employees with face coverings may be asked to lower their face coverings briefly for identification purposes in compliance with safety and security requirements. At least weekly, covered contractors must check the CDC COVID-19 Data Tracker County View for community transmission information in all areas with a covered contractor workplace to determine proper workplace safety protocols. When the level of community transmission in the area of a covered contractor workplace increases from low or moderate to substantial or high, contractors and subcontractors should put in place more protective workplace safety protocols consistent with published guidelines.

However, when the level of community transmission in the area of a covered contractor workplace is reduced from high or substantial to moderate or low, it must remain at that lower level for at least two consecutive weeks before the covered contractor utilizes those protocols recommended for areas of moderate or low community transmission.

COVID-19 Workplace Safety Coordinator

Covered contractors must designate one or more workers to coordinate the implementation of and compliance with this Guidance. The COVID-19 coordinator(s) may be the same individual(s) responsible for implementing any COVID-19 workplace safety protocols required by local, state or federal law. Their responsibilities to coordinate COVID-19 workplace safety protocols may comprise some or all of their regular duties.

These coordinators must ensure that information on required COVID-19 workplace safety protocols is provided to covered contractor employees and all other individuals likely to be present at covered contractor workplaces. This includes communicating required workplace safety protocols and related policies by email, websites, memoranda, flyers, or other means.

Coordinators should also post signage at covered contractor workplaces that sets forth the requirements and workplace safety protocols in this Guidance in a readily understandable manner. Coordinator(s) must also ensure that covered contractor employees comply with the requirements in this Guidance related to the showing or provision of proper vaccination documentation.

This is not intended to be exhaustive nor should any discussion or opinions be construed as legal advice. Readers should contact legal counsel or an insurance professional for appropriate advice.

Read More

On Sept. 24, 2021, the Safer Federal Workforce Task Force (Task Force) released new guidance (the Guidance) on COVID-19 workplace safety protocols for federal contractors and subcontractors. The goal of the Guidance is to get more people vaccinated.

The Guidance requires each covered contract and contract-like instrument to include a clause requiring the contractor and their subcontractors to comply with all guidelines for workplace locations published by the Task Force.

These workplace safety protocols will apply to all covered contractor employees, including contractor or subcontractor employees in covered contractor workplaces who are not working on a federal government contract or contract-like instrument.

Federal contractors and subcontractors with a covered contract will be required to conform to the following workplace safety protocols:

  1. COVID-19 vaccination;
  2. Masking and physical distancing; and
  3. and Appointment of COVID-19 coordinators

Action Steps

Covered contractors must review and adhere to the requirements of the Guidance. They are also responsible for ensuring that covered contractor employees comply with workplace safety protocols.

Visit our blog page to read the full COVID-19 Workplace Safety Guidance for Federal Contractor and Subcontractors

https://www.mwpins.com/blog/

Covered Contractor Guidance

Covered contractor employees must comply with agency COVID-19 workplace safety requirements while in federal workplaces. Agencies are strongly encouraged to incorporate a clause requiring compliance with this Guidance into contracts that are not covered or directly addressed by the executive order—Ensuring Adequate COVID-19 Safety Protocols for Federal Contractors (the order) because the contractor is under the Simplified Acquisition Threshold as defined in section 2.101 of the Federal Acquisition Regulation (FAR) or is a contract or subcontract for the manufacturing of products.

Covered Contractors

Federal contractors are subject to the Guidance if they have a covered contract. Covered contractors include executive departments and agencies, including independent establishments subject to the Federal Property and Administrative Services Act.

Covered contracts include any new contract; contract-like instrument; solicitation for a contract or contract-like instrument; extension or renewal of an existing contract or contract-like instrument; and exercise of an option on an existing contract or contract-like instrument, if it is a:

  1. Procurement contract or contract-like instrument for services, construction, or a leasehold interest in real property;
  2. Contract or contract-like instrument for services covered by the Service Contract Act, 41 U.S.C. 6701 et seq.;
  3. Contract or contract-like instrument for concessions, including any concessions contract excluded by Department of Labor regulations at 29 C.F.R. 4.133(b); or
  4. Contract or contract-like instrument entered into with the federal government in connection with federal property or lands and related to offering services for federal employees, their dependents, or the general public.

The Guidance does not apply to (i) grants; (ii) contracts, contract-like instruments, or agreements with Indian Tribes under the Indian Self-Determination and Education Assistance Act (Public Law 93-638), as amended; (iii) contracts or subcontracts whose value is equal to or less than the simplified acquisition threshold, as the term is defined in section 2.101 of the Federal Acquisition Regulation; (iv) employees who perform work outside the United States or its outlying areas, as those terms are defined in section 2.101 of the Federal Acquisition Regulation; or (v) subcontracts solely for the provision of products.

Vaccination Requirements

Covered contractors must ensure that all covered contractor employees are fully vaccinated for COVID-19 unless the employee is legally entitled to an accommodation. Covered contractor employees must be fully vaccinated no later than Dec. 8, 2021. After that date, all covered contractor employees must be fully vaccinated by the first day of the period of performance on an exercised option or extended or renewed contract when the clause has been incorporated into the covered contract.

Covered contractors may be required to provide accommodations to covered contractor employees who communicate to their covered contractor that they are not vaccinated against COVID-19 because of a disability (which would include medical conditions) or a sincerely held religious belief, practice, or observance. Covered contractors should review and consider what accommodations they must offer. Requests for “medical accommodation” or “medical exceptions” should be treated as requests for disability accommodations.

Should a federal agency have an urgent, mission-critical need for a covered contractor to have covered contractor employees begin work on a covered contract or at a covered workplace before becoming fully vaccinated, the agency head may approve an exception for the covered contractor. In the case of such limited exceptions, covered contractors must ensure these covered contractor employees are fully vaccinated within 60 days of beginning work on a covered contract or at a covered workplace. Covered contractors must further ensure that such employees comply with masking and physical distancing requirements in covered workplaces prior to being fully vaccinated.

Covered contractors must review their covered employees’ documentation to prove vaccination status. Covered contractors must require covered contractor employees to show or provide one of the following copies:

  1. The record of immunization from a health care provider or pharmacy;
  2. The COVID-19 vaccination record card;
  3. Medical records documenting the vaccination;
  4. Immunization records from a public health or State immunization information system; or
  5. Any other official documentation verifying vaccination with information on the vaccine name, date(s) of administration, and the name of health care professional or clinic site administering vaccine.

Covered contractors may allow covered contractor employees to show or provide their employer with a digital copy of such records, including a:

  1. Digital photo;
  2. Scanned image; or
  3. PDF of such a record.

Covered contractors must ensure compliance with the requirements in this Guidance related to the showing or provision of proper vaccination documentation. They are strongly encouraged to incorporate similar vaccination requirements into their non-covered contracts and agreements with noncovered contractors whose employees perform work at covered contractor workplaces but who do not work on or in connection with a federal contract (e.g., such as those contracts and agreements related to the provision of food services, on-site security or grounds keeping services at covered contractor workplaces).

Face Coverings and Physical Distancing

Covered contractors must ensure that all individuals, including covered contractor employees and visitors, comply with published Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) guidance for masking and physical distancing at a covered contractor workplace. In addition to the face coverings and physical distance guidance, contractors must follow applicable CDC guidance for mask-wearing and physical distancing in specific settings, including health care, transportation, correctional and detention facilities, and schools.

Fully vaccinated individuals must wear a mask in indoor settings, except for limited exceptions in areas of high or substantial community transmission. In addition, fully vaccinated individuals do not need to wear a mask in areas of low or moderate community transmission, nor do they need to physically distance, regardless of the level of transmission in the area.

Individuals who are not fully vaccinated must wear a mask indoors and in certain outdoor settings, regardless of the level of community transmission in the area. To the extent practicable, individuals who are not fully vaccinated should maintain a distance of at least 6 feet from others at all times, including in offices, conference rooms, and all other communal and workspaces.

Covered contractors must require individuals in covered contractor workplaces who are required to wear a mask to:

  1. Wear appropriate masks consistently and correctly (over mouth and nose).
  2. Wear appropriate masks in any common area or shared workspace (including open floorplan office spaces, cubicle embankments, and conference rooms).
  3. Wear a mask in crowded outdoor settings or during outdoor activities that involve sustained close contact with other people who are not fully vaccinated, consistent with CDC guidance.

Covered contractors may be required to provide an accommodation to covered contractor employees that cannot wear masks because of a disability or because of a sincerely held religious belief, practice, or observance. Covered contractors should review and consider what accommodation they must offer. Covered contractors may provide exceptions to face covering and/or physical distancing requirements consistent with CDC guidelines. They may also provide exceptions for covered contractor employees who are unable to wear a mask because of difficulty breathing or activities for which wearing a mask would create a risk to workplace safety as determined by a workplace risk assessment. Any exceptions must be approved in writing by an authorized representative of the covered contractor to ensure compliance with this Guidance at covered contractor workplaces.

Employees with face coverings may be asked to lower their face coverings briefly for identification purposes in compliance with safety and security requirements. At least weekly, covered contractors must check the CDC COVID-19 Data Tracker County View for community transmission information in all areas with a covered contractor workplace to determine proper workplace safety protocols. When the level of community transmission in the area of a covered contractor workplace increases from low or moderate to substantial or high, contractors and subcontractors should put in place more protective workplace safety protocols consistent with published guidelines.

However, when the level of community transmission in the area of a covered contractor workplace is reduced from high or substantial to moderate or low, it must remain at that lower level for at least two consecutive weeks before the covered contractor utilizes those protocols recommended for areas of moderate or low community transmission.

COVID-19 Workplace Safety Coordinator

Covered contractors must designate one or more workers to coordinate the implementation of and compliance with this Guidance. The COVID-19 coordinator(s) may be the same individual(s) responsible for implementing any COVID-19 workplace safety protocols required by local, state or federal law. Their responsibilities to coordinate COVID-19 workplace safety protocols may comprise some or all of their regular duties.

These coordinators must ensure that information on required COVID-19 workplace safety protocols is provided to covered contractor employees and all other individuals likely to be present at covered contractor workplaces. This includes communicating required workplace safety protocols and related policies by email, websites, memoranda, flyers, or other means.

Coordinators should also post signage at covered contractor workplaces that sets forth the requirements and workplace safety protocols in this Guidance in a readily understandable manner. Coordinator(s) must also ensure that covered contractor employees comply with the requirements in this Guidance related to the showing or provision of proper vaccination documentation.

This is not intended to be exhaustive nor should any discussion or opinions be construed as legal advice. Readers should contact legal counsel or an insurance professional for appropriate advice.

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